At London Fashion Week's Estethica, British Go for Gold

Bonnie Alter/CC BY 2.0

It's London Fashion Week and the British are making Olympian efforts at Estethica, the show for London's ethical fashion industry. This is the thirteenth and the most exciting in ages, with new designers, both international and British. Here is the best of the British.

1. Julian Hakes London

These are the shoes to die for. Made by Julian Hakes, an architect and unexpected show designer. He first released the early concept images of this shoe design on Dezeen and it went viral. A career was born.

Called Mojito, it has no sole and no upper but instead supports the foot on a continuous loop. The design consists of a single piece that wraps around the wearer’s foot, forming support for the heel and ball.

Bonnie Alter/CC BY 2.0

The shoes are a digital design and can be made anywhere; which cuts down on transport and air miles. They are made of a polycarbonate which is recyclable and real leather. They come in a small box and nestle in together for a more economical fit.

2. Auria X Margot Bowman

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Auria X Margot Bowman design swim suits: a new addition to Estethica. This lovely collection is called Artemis, after the Greek goddess of hunting. Hence the arrow theme. The one and two piece swim suits come in acid coloured pastels with patterns that are fun and experimental.

The swimwear is made from a new generation, completely environmental, fabric. It is made from 100% recycled hallow polyamide which is made from discarded products such as fishing nets, voile and old carpets.

3. Makepiece

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This is a mauve year for Makepiece with all their clothes in this palette. They were influenced by the endless rain; including floods that almost forced them to cancel their visit this year. Their small town of Hebden Bridge was flooded twice this summer by rain but they pulled it out of the hat with the help of a generous sponsor, recovered and have this lovely collection.

Their sweaters and dresses are all wool, inspired by their location in an area of the UK that has been a wool and textile area for centuries. The designers keep their own sheep, (one of the 3 partners doubles as the shepherdess), buy yarn from British farms and spin it within 20 miles of their studio.

Other British brands that are long standing stalwarts of Estethica have happily returned including Ada Zanditon, Henrietta Ludgate, Junky Styling, Victim Fashion Street and Pachacuti.

4. Winner of Estethcia/Veolia Re-Source Competition

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This is the future. Liora Lasselle, the designer, is the winner of a competition run by the British Fashion Council with Central Saint Martins, an art school. Lasselle will get a grant to create an upcycled capsule collection. As part of the prize she will get to develop, source, produce and promote her collection in the upcoming February Fashion Week. She uses sustainable natural fabrics made in the UK in her work and household waste such as tin and plastic bags for the decoration.

5. Green Cut

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Green Cut is a glamorous Hollywood style tribute to fashion, film and sustainability. Organized by Livia Firth, and associated with the The Green Carpet Challenge®, eight fashion designers were paired with eight iconic British films and challenged to create a special dress that would be a contemporary take on a classic film. They had to follow the sustainable criteria developed by The Green Carpet Challenge.

Here are the Green Cut designer and film pairings:

From bottom right to top left:
• Darling, Directed by John Schlesinger (1965) - Re-interpreted by Tom Ford
• Accident, Directed by Harold Pinter, (1967) - Re-interpreted by Stella McCartney
• Velvet Goldmine, Directed by Todd Haynes, (1998) - Re-interpreted by Alice Temperley
• Evergreen, Directed by Victor Saville (1934) - Re-interpreted by Antonio Berardi

Bonnie Alter/CC BY 2.0

From bottom left to top right:
• The Red Shoes, Directed by Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger, (1948) - Re-interpreted by Jonathan Saunders
• Its Love Again, Directed by Victor Saville (1936) - Re-interpreted by Roksanda Ilincic
• Things to Come, Directed by William Cameron Menzies, (1936) - Re-interpreted by Marios Schwab
• My Fair Lady, Directed by George Cukor (1964) - Hat creation re-interpreted by Stephen Jones

Tags: Designers | London | Sustainable Fabrics

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