Wild and Woolly Fashion at Wool Modern


Photo: B. Alter, Sibling

Wool Modern is a special show that showcases the best in fashion design in wool. It's not part of London Fashion Week, or the London Design Festival but it should be. The designers included in the show have used the sustainable fibre in innovative and exciting ways for both clothing and furniture.

Sculpted, knitted, draped, embroidered and knitted, this shows proves that "if silk is the queen, cotton the aunt and linen the uncle, then wool is the king".The exhibition is part of Wool Week which was Initiated by Prince Charles last year. It's part of The Campaign for Wool, to get manufacturers and the public to recognise its virtues and support sheep farming and the British wool industry. All of the designers have either loaned pieces from their archives to the show or created new ones specially.

Wool is one of the oldest fibres known to man. It is biodegradable, sustainable and renewable.


Photo: B Alter, David Koma

This sexy little number is made of 100% wool with brass and silk decorations


Photo: B. Alter, Nasir Mazhar

How could you not love this turban made of 92% wool.


Photo: B. Alter, Brita Teleman

These stools are made by layering pieces of wool felt. The seat and base are all interchangeable so that the colours can reordered and rearranged.


Photo: B. Alter, Isabel Berglund

This is called Queens Chair but it looks like a mermaid to us. It is a hand-knitted woollen sculpture that is part art, part design, part architecture.


Photo: B. Alter, Kai Linke

This is made out of wool felt and called the dahlia. It is an interchangeable seat cushion and stool. The many layers of felt are connected with each other so that it holds a person and is actually much stronger than it looks.


Photo: B. Alter, Rug: Christopher Farr, Dress: Craig Lawrence

The rug is designed by fashion designer Romeo Gigli and is hand dyed and hand spun. The hand knitted dress is also made of pure wool. The fabric has been stripped and looped, as the artist uses the fabric in a new, cutting edge way.

Some Woolly Facts:
The number of breeding ewes in Britain was 20M in the 1990's and is 14M now, but rising. This is because the price of wool has increased so it has finally become profitable to keep sheep as well as shear them. There are 1 billion sheep in the world. In Britain there are sixty recognised breeds, more than any other country. Seventy per cent of all British wool is used to make carpets. Wool fibre can be bent 20,000 times without breaking.

More on Wool Week
London's National Wool Week Celebrates This Sustainable Material
It's Wool Week : A Celebration of Sheep
Rescue Me

Tags: Designers | Green Fashion | Sustainable Fabrics | Technology