Shouldn't a Company Protect the Species in its Logo?

Smart marketing is an essential part of every successful corporation, and few strategies are more important than creating a memorable logo--and among these designs, animals have long been fixtures. From cars and clothing to cigarettes and booze, there's no better way to class-up a product than to associate it with one of nature's creations. But as corporations spend all that time and money branding themselves with the image of animals, while in some cases, the real things are dying off. That's why one initiative, Save Your Logo, is asking companies to step up to the plate and give something back to creatures that have been their public face.
Yesterday, polo-shirt manufacturer Michel Lacoste from the first international brand to participate in the Save Your Logo campaign, was in South America to meet with one of the crocodiles that helped inspire the company's famous logo. Locoste has committed to helping preserve the Orinoco crocodile, native to the Colombia and Venezuela, which under threat of extinction from hunting and habitat loss. The company says working to protect the species is part of its "civic responsibility."

"The crocodile was the nickname of my father when he played tennis, and if we can give this animal a bit of everything you gave us, it would be a shame not to take this opportunity," Locoste told the AFP.

According to Save Your Logo, participating companies invest in an endowment fund for biodiversity where the money is distributed for conservation projects. But since many species that aren't logos need help too, some of that money will go towards protecting lesser known species--which is good news for the blobfish, since chances are no endorsement deals are heading its way anytime soon.

(I, as the creator of the t-shirt design above, hereby allow, nay, strongly encourage it be reproduced.)
More on Responsible Companies
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Who Is Responsible for How Responsible a Company Is?
HP Follows Dell's Lead, Bans e-Waste Exports

Tags: Animals | Clothing | Colombia | Endangered Species


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