Piggy Paint Nail Polish Turns Toes Green (In a Good Way!)



Piggy Paint Nail Polish is geared to kids, but adults will love their non-toxic formula, too. Photos courtesy of Piggy Paint.

This little piggy went to market, this little piggy stayed home. This little piggy ate roast beef, this little piggy had none. And this little piggy went "Wee, wee, wee" all the way . . . green?

The chemicals in most nail polishes had me thinking twice about nail polish this summer—until I gave Piggy Paint a second chance.

Marketed as a kid-friendly, non-toxic nail polish, Piggy Paint is equally great for eco-friendly, health-conscious adults. The water-based, odorless polish is free of formaldehyde, toluene, phthalates, bisphenol A, ethyl acetate and acetone. And did I mention it comes in a wide range of bright colors, perfect for summer?

The real question however is: does it actually work?The company sent me a sample bottle of Piggy Paint in March. I excitedly ripped open the package and applied a couple of coats that afternoon, but it didn't live up to my expectations. I liked the consistency and the coverage, but when I made soup for dinner that night, I realized the nail polish was flaking off, ending up in the pot with the carrots, onion and celery. Yuck.

Piggy Paint vs. Butter London

About a week ago I decided to give the Piggy Paint polish another chance, albeit under the guise of testing it against the somewhat-eco-friendly Butter London nail color I'd just picked up (Butter London is free of the three big chemicals: formaldehyde, toluene and dibutyl phthalate, or DBP). Piggy Paint went on one foot and Butter London went on the other. I expected the Piggy Paint to chip off quickly, but it lasted several days, matching the performance of the Butter London nail color.

Looking back, my problem was probably the cold. I didn't pay attention to the instructions for setting the polish (one minute of blow-drying on a low, warm setting). While I forgot the blow drier again last week, the air temperature is a heck of a lot warmer.

I'm just glad I gave it another shot. I love the fact that Piggy Paint doesn't smell (not so with Butter London) and since I just happened to find Piggy Paint stocked at a local eco-friendly store, I don't have to shop online and wait for delivery (it only takes 1-3 days, but when a girl needs new polish, she needs new polish).

Non-Toxic Nail Polish Remover

Piggy Paint also makes a non-toxic nail polish remover. It's acetone-free, made with natural products, biodegradable and odorless, plus it works on any nail lacquer. Performance-wise, it takes a little more effort to get the polish off your nails, but I'm willing to apply a little elbow grease for the sake of my health.

The price point's not bad either. One polish will set you back $9.99 and remover is $10.50. For a couple bucks more than I paid for that one bottle of Butter polish, I can get one Piggy Paint polish and the remover.

The bottom line: I will be painting my little piggies with Piggy Paint this summer.

::Piggy Paint
More on Nail Polish:
Honeybee Gardens Nail Polish
Lipstick, Shampoo, Nail Polish - How Toxic is OK?
Priti Organic Spa

Tags: Beauty Treatments | Cosmetics | Toxins

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