Lav & Kush's Sustainable Lounge-Meets-Office Wear Misses the Mark for Fall 2011 (Photos)


All Photos: Lav & Kush

Lav & Kush is set on designing clothes that are comfortable, functional, and that look good too. Based in Vancouver, Canada, the sustainable fashion label gives wearable basics a feminine twist. A ruffle lining the hood of a sweatshirt, a little black dress with edge, and more, hits--and misses--in their fall 2011 collection. Take a look:
Inspired to design for the "urban woman who wants to look good during a cozy night at home," designer Angela Saxena creates a collection that appeals to more than one style aesthetic.

Comprised of dresses perfect for the office and others better for at home, a floral skirt more suitable for summer, and uber-girly lounge wear, Lav & Kush's fall 2011 collection has a balanced number of hits and misses. Viewed separately the individual pieces have potential but as a cohesive collection, it fails.


A great office look for summer and fall.

A versatile little black dress that can be worn to work or at home.

A dress with pockets and a hood is ideal for lounging.

A floral skirt that will not easily transition from season to season.

An over-sized graphic t-shirt that looks amiss.

A rouched top like this is unflattering on most body types.

This "cute" sweatshirt is a miss, all I can see is Little Bo Peep.

Their spring 2011 collection offers far more pieces that can be worn season after season while the fall 2011 is less than memorable.

To shop the collection, which ranges in price from $130-150, visit their convenient online shop at Lav and Kush.

What do you think of the collection? Tell us below.

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More Lav & Kush
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Lav & Kush Offers 25% Off Sustainable Fashion
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Tags: Canada | Clothing

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