Is Forever 21 an Eco-Fashion Design Thief? (Photos)


Battle of the prints: Feral Childe vs. Forever 21. Photo: courtesy Donger / Burrroughs APC

If imitation is a form of flattery, than fast fashion retailer Forever 21 must be fond of eco-fashion label Feral Childe.

Feral Childe design duo Alice Wu and Moriah Carlson are taking legal action against Forever 21 for copyright infringement, alleging that the the fast fashion company has "copied one of Feral Childe's original hand-created designs, and created and sold apparel bearing this design," according to a press release issued Thursday by their lawyers at Donger / Burrroughs APC.

Which Is Which?


Photos: courtesy Donger / Burrroughs APC

Hard to tell, right? Well the top belongs to Feral Childe and the bottom, Forever 21. From afar it looks like a bunch of marks that bear no distinguishable attributes but up close you can clearly see what looks like an upside-down teepee.

Feral Childe produces their entire line in New York's Garment Center and has, according to Wu, "always strived to create the very best in innovative, ethically-produced clothing that is made to last." She continues, "Forever 21's copying and mass production of our original textile design without our permission is just plain wrong."

According to the press release, issued by Feral Childe's legal representation, "a review of the above images makes clear that Forever 21 has continued in its campaign to steal outright the creative output of some of the brightest minds in the apparel industry, and trample the intellectual property rights of others in an attempt to boost profits." The case is currently pending in the Central District of Los Angeles, California.

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