Carmina Campus is the Ultimate Eco-Fashion Handbag


Image from bagcraze
Carmina Campus--the ultimate in decadent eco-fashion? Well it has to be up there--it's a new-ish brand owned and designed by a member of the Fendi family--one of fashion's biggest fashion labels. Translated as "chants of the field", Carmina Campus bags are definitely a luxury item, almost in the wretched excess department.

But they are made of completely recycled materials in a way that is clever, cool and elegant, all in one. And much of the profit is being put back into charities. If Fendi can carry it off, why can't Chanel, Prada, etc. etc. give it a go... More on eco-luxury after the fold.


Image from yoox

Using every imaginable combination of recycled items, the bags are made of pieces of truck tarpaulin, garden umbrellas,industrial waste, fake leather bits,vintage fabrics, with some re-cycled objects like metal bottle caps for good measure. Each bag is one of a kind, matched by a number and a photo--and they should be for the prices charged, with most being in the £500 and up range. Sigh.

The business is the brainchild of Ilaria Venturini Fendi, a daughter of Anna Fendi of the famous company. Raised in the atmosphere of the family business, she became deeply involved in the running of an organic farm. She realised that production of consumer items could be recreated in an environmentally friendly way. Using her fashion know-how, and fabulous connections, she began working with skilled artisans to create a series of bags to help fund social campaigns in aid of women in the third world.

Working with NGOs operating mostly in Africa to fund projects and work programmes, many of the lines of the bags have a theme and a charitable cause.


Image from Carmina Campus

The Baobags have a large machine-made embroidery of an African woman and a baobab tree on the front. For each bag sold, a 20 € contribution will be donated to ngo AIDOS to support the "Adopt a Mother" campaign.


Image from Carmina Campus

The Stop FGM bags are part of a campaign to stop female genital mutilation. On one side there is still the STOPFGM! logo, while the other side is made of all kinds of recycled bits complete with metal bottle caps and shutter straps.

In an interview, Venturini Fendi says "Compulsive shopping makes no sense. It's better to give ourselves time to gather detailed information about every object or clothing item we buy, learn about how it was made and by whom. A label like we now find on food would be a good start. And we need to go back and find our respect for things, avoiding waste." : Carmina Campus

Tags: Accessories | Designers | Recycled Consumer Goods