Solar wagon delivers a self-contained portable water purification system

When you've got clean drinking water, you don't really think to much about it, but when you don't have access to potable water, however, it can be a life or death issue. In remote areas, without a power grid or water infrastructure, obtaining enough safe drinking water for a family or village can be a huge problem that has to be addressed day in and day out.

There are a variety of different solutions for enabling people in water poverty to obtain access to clean drinking water, from personal devices that don't require power to solar stills, but the Solar Wagon, from Water One World Solutions, offers a self-contained and self-powered water purification system on wheels.

This "turn-key" mobile unit integrates a solar panel and battery storage with a filtration and purification system into a utility wagon that can be easily transported to the water source, supplying up to 4320 gallons of safe drinking water per day.

"ViroBac™ is the proprietary filtration media developed by Water One. Combined with ultraviolet light, absolute-micron filtration and precise capacity metering, our three and four tiered fail-safe engineered systems ensure that every drop of finished water meets World Health Organization and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency standards by removing 99.99 percent of bacteria and 99.7 percent of viruses. Bacteria and viruses are killed instantly, on contact and no disinfection chemicals are required."

The Solar Wagon isn't cheap (about $12,000), so they aren't a great choice for a village to purchase themselves, but they could be a great option for being sponsored by a charity or organization in the first world. The systems can produce clean potable water for drinking or cooking from any surface water source, well, cistern or tank. within minutes of being set up, and in the first year of operation, the Solar Wagon can produce 144,000 gallons of safe drinking water.

Water One World Solutions also offers a version of the system that uses a generator instead of a solar panel, as well as a self-contained trailer that can put out 20,000 gallons of water per day, which could be of great use in disaster and refugee relief. Find out more at their website.

Tags: Drinking Water | Technology