Amazing Land Art by Andrew Rogers

Jennifer Hattam
Living / Culture
June 21, 2010

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australia bunjil andrew rogers land art photo
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From high plains to deep gorges, deserts to rural fields, sculptor Andrew Rogers uses rock walls to outline the forms of symbols important to cultures around the world. Over the past decade, his massive land art pieces have spanned five continents, and most recently he was behind the world's largest land art exhibit in Turkey's Cappadocia region -- all are part of his ambitious "Rhythms of Life" project.

"Bunjil," Australia

The wedge-tailed eagle is an important ancestral spirit of the Kulin land in western Australia. The indigenous Wathaurong people believe the eagle "made the animals and the plants and taught the people how to behave on Earth....and how to conduct the ceremonies that would ensure the continuation of life" -- a theme Rogers says resonated with his concept of his project as "a continuous link between past and present."

Photo by Andrew Rogers