Solar Aid: the UK's First Solar Charity for the Developing World is Launched

Just a couple of weeks ago we interviewed Jeremy Leggett , CEO of London based SolarCentury. It seems that he and his team have been busy since then. Last week, his company announced that they were the UK's fastest growing renewable energy company for the second year running, and the day after that they made a high-profile pledge that the company would be donating 5% of its net profit to SolarAid, the UK's first solar energy charity for the developing world. The charity was launched at the Climate Clinic Night at the Labour Party Conference in Manchester this week, ensuring high visibility amongst politicians and decision makers. The charity aims to relieve poverty through the use of solar energy. It will also run education projects in matters relating to solar energy, climate change and the protection of the environment. SolarAid will also carry out research into renewable energy generation, distribution, supply and use in the developing world.Jeremy Leggett, who is also a trustee of SolarAid, described the organisation's mission thus:

"Our vision is a world where everyone has affordable, clean, renewable power. We believe that this is crucial for sustainable development that builds communities while protecting the environment and fighting climate change. If developing countries start using renewable energy now, they can grow in a sustainable way that protects their people and the environment."

SolarAid is seeking to become the charity of choice for the solar sector and the leading international agency on renewable energy for development. In many ways this is similar to the Sun Park project we reported on a couple of weeks ago, in that individuals who are enthusiastic about solar power, but who cannot afford to install their own photovoltaic systems, now have an opportunity to donate to projects that are installing and developing the technology elsewhere. In the process they might just help make the world a better place. [Written by: Sami Grover]