Pedal-Power in Detroit: Green Gym for the Homeless


Green Gym in Detroit. Photo courtesy of Cass Community Social Services

Between 1950 and 1980, Detroit lost 500,000 trees to Dutch elm disease, urban expansion and attrition, according to Paul Bairley, director of Urban Forestry for The Greening of Detroit. Among the city's various environmental initiatives, it's looking to slash residential land use by 30 percent, letting areas grow into natural greenways. There are green job initiatives, and for the homeless, a community center provides training for eco-conscious work and just opened a human-generated workout room. With green gyms popping up in Seattle and Hong Kong, why aren't we tapping into sweat equity everywhere?Gives new meaning to upcyling
Converting otherwise wasted energy, from the kinetic motion of treadmills, elliptical machines, and stationary bikes, into renewable energy is cost-effective and energy-efficient. That's what a community organization in Detroit did this week with its new green gym, for people living in its transitional housing and other shelter programs, staff and volunteers. "Not only is this gym a good idea for the environment, but it will help build the general health of our clients who often struggle with diabetes or heart disease," states Rev. Faith Fowler, the executive director.

The Cass Green Gym's facility offers weight machines, boxing bags, a treadmill, and stationary bikes featuring Green Revolution technology that generates electricity. Cass Community Social Services (CCSS), located on Detroit's Cass Avenue, projects that full classes with ten people, is enough power to light three homes for an entire year. It will redirect it back to the building's electrical grid, reducing operating costs.


Dial up the electricity to light up to 72 homes while spinning. Photo by Jane La Motta

The company, Green Revolution, taps into pedal power, providing exercise machines and consulting to facilities, harnessing the energy of gym rats into green power. Its technology can be installed on most brands of indoor cycling equipment. At its retrofit gym in Ridgefield, Connecticut, a typical cycling class with 20 bikes has the potential to produce up to 3.6 Megawatts (3,600,000 watts) of renewable energy a year. This is equivalent to lighting 72 homes for a month, and reduces carbon emissions by over 5,000 pounds.

CCSS also links job training and permanent employment with ways to reduce the footprint. One venture, modeled after a Native American enterprise in Oklahoma, recycles old illegally dumped tires from vacant lots and converts them into mud mats. So far, formerly homeless men have collected more than 5,000 tires and sold over 2,000 mats. Another of its programs involves x-ray recycling, removing patient information from films and packaging the remains for recycling. And its document shredding effort will reuse the paper for insulation in seniors and low-income homes.

As a native Detroiter, who worked a block from this center, renewal efforts are personally meaningful to me -- and it should be for all of us. It was heartening to read a Time article on addressing urban post-industrial problems: "we could regenerate not just a city but our sense of who we are."

More on green gyms:
Chinese Seniors at "Outdoor Gym" Generate Electricity For Local TVs
Survey: Do You Go To the Gym
Green Power-Generating Gyms Becoming More Common

Tags: Alternative Energy | Biking | Detroit | Environmental Footprint