The Wildlife Conservation Society Welcomes Two Hyenas to the Bronx Zoo


Kubwa, a spotted hyena, roams the African Plains exhibit at the Bronx Zoo, NYC. Credit: Julie Larsen Maher ©WCS

The African Plains exhibit at the Wildlife Conservation Society's Bronx Zoo in New York, now has two spotted hyenas or "laughing hyenas", as they are famously known. Native to both the African and Asian continents, hyenas are not an endangered species. However, they are at risk of human expansion, which has caused a decrease in their west African population. The Wildlife Conservation Society has signed agreements with the Government of Southern Sudan to protect and conserve the region's wildlife and land through community-based strategies and policies. It has been over thirty years since the Bronx Zoo has been home to the spotted hyena and now they have two. The animals are male and female siblings born at the Denver Zoo in March 2008. Kubwa (Swahili for "big") is so named for her large head and weighs approximately 91 pounds. Her brother Kidogo (Swahili for "small"), named after his small head, weighs 75 pounds.

Jim Breheny, Director of the Bronx Zoo and Senior Vice President of WCS Living Institutions, says "We are pleased to have hyenas back at the zoo so that our visitors can get a glimpse of these amazing creatures and learn more about their importance to the ecosystem." The hyenas presence at the Zoo will hopefully raise public interest in WCS' efforts to conserve the animals natural habitat in Southern Sudan.

To learn more or make a donation to support the WCS and the conservation of wildlife and wild places, visit The Wildlife Conservation Society.

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Tags: Africa | Animals | Conservation | New York City