Good News from Uganda: Animal Populations Soaring in National Parks Thanks to Anti-Poaching Efforts


Elephants and impalas are both doing well in Uganda. Photo by frederic.salein via Flickr.

In 1999, poaching had reduced the number of impalas, a type of grazing antelope, in Uganda to just 1,600 animals. Today, there are more than 35,000 -- and populations of many other species have soared as well, thanks to successful efforts to reduce the amount of poaching in the country's protected areas."The number of animals in Uganda's national parks and game reserves has soared over the past decade," according to the Uganda Wildlife Authority, the BBC reported Saturday. "The latest figures show that the population of some species has doubled since 1999."

Though the impala showed the biggest increase since the time of the last year, populations of buffalos, elephants, giraffes, hippopotamuses, waterbucks, and zebras are all also on the rise.

Combating Poaching the Key
The key to this success has been combating poaching, a scourge on the continent that has recently caused the death of the last female white rhinoceros in a South African reserve and could drive African elephants to extinction altogether by 2025 at present poaching rates.

UWA spokeswoman Lillian Nsubuga said the group has "been able to reduce poaching by improving the monitoring of national parks and reserves and by offering incentives to local communities to protect wildlife," according to the BBC, which also noted the role played by expelling rebel groups. Via: "Animal populations surge in Ugandan national parks," BBC.

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Tags: Animals | Conservation | Uganda

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