Super Sheds: Coming to Your Backyard Soon


moonroom

As we noted last year in an earlier roundup of modern sheds, they are an great way to get more space without more mortgage, and the gateway drug for modern prefab. There has been so much action in the shed world that it is time for an update. Shown above is the Moonroom, from Roomworks in the UK. Paul Barton told Alex at Shedworking that "they are regularly asked if they can produce really tiny garden office rooms. "So we've put one together - same super-insulated shell 100mm SIPS walls, floor, roof, etc - but just smaller." The working title for the ad campaign is "When you want more space and don't want it to cost the earth" We're trying to bring these in under £5,000 and the spec is high - so it'll be really good value."

In the UK they are just nuts about sheds. I was recently a judge in the Shed of the Year competition on We Love Sheds, and while I did not particularly love the winner, it had a lot going for it.

I was also a judge for the international award, which came down to a slugfest between Chuck Witmer in Silver Spring, Maryland, and James Glave in Vancouver, British Columbia. Chuck wrote:

I am BIG on sustainability so I utilized as much recycled materials as possible from the local recycled material shop; Community Forklift. I designed my 16' long window on the east side out of IKEA glass shelving and framed and butt glazed it myself.

More on Chuck Witmer's shed at Gotta Garden Shed? Enter it in the Shed of the Year Competition

But being at TreeHugger, how could I not be entranced by James Glave's Ecoshed. He writes:

My Eco-Shed is "deep green" -- it is a passive-solar design that requires very little energy, and thus carbon emissions, to heat and light. We built it with 95 percent reclaimed or sustainably harvested lumber (the rafters you see supporting the roof were once part of a railroad trestle). The steel roof is configured for rainwater harvesting, the insulation is well beyond code requirements, the foundation uses low-fly-ash concrete, and we used innovative framing techniques on the north wall to lessen heat loss. The building also includes a heat-recovery ventilation system, highly efficient lighting and plumbing fixtures, and it is surrounded by an organic food-garden-in-progress.

He even wrote a book about it and his personal green tranformation called Almost Green, and you can stay in his shed- go to Eco-shed.ca

I certainly couldn't make up my mind, and Chuck Witmer edged out a victory.


Why are sheds so popular?

Tags: Canada | Green Building | Less Is More | Living With Less

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