The Mobile Bread-House is a rolling bakery made from pallets

What's not to love about a tiny mobile art project made of old pallets, everything made from recycled materials, acting as " a Social Incubator that uses the act of bread-making as an artistic and social medium." The only thing I can think of is that highly flammable pallet lumber and rocket stoves are not a good mix, or that it would be nice if it kept the rain out. But other than that, there are some wonderful things going on here.

© Raymond Olive

Designer and builder Raymond Olive describes the structure:

The exterior of the Mobile Bread-House borrows from the design vernacular of the B-Home. This MBH is composed of a hexagonal structure made of pallets sitting atop a retrofitted boat trailer. The hexagonal structure defines the interior space, which is custom outfitted with a sink, table, seating, storage, and oven to support the Bread-House Methodology for Community Building.

© Raymond Olive

Visitors can sit at the "cultural shift table" and knead the bread dough (they could really pound away, this thing is built like a tank). There is a "bread archive" that is also a warm lighting system,

© Raymond Olive

plus a candelabra made from wine bottles and a bike wheel.

© Raymond Olive

Raymond discusses the output of the oven.

Bread is a cultural fiber woven within our societal fabric, composed of three basic ingredients: flour, salt, and water. Throughout time they have been interpreted in many formats in pursuit of creating both a domestic and ceremonial product that is the perfect balance of form, function, and representation. Bread-Making is an artistic expression that requires no formal skill, it is democratic, therefore it transcends race, creed, and socio-economics, most importantly it is delicious.

© Raymond Olive

The Mobile Bread-House’s use of reclaimed materials provides for a critique of issues concerning waste culture, pallet wood being the primary medium in the installation is used structurally and decoratively throughout the space, the reclamation of the material conjures a variety of notions dutifully left to further artistic interpretation. The elevation of the material inspires the visitor to think about what they can do with everyday waste.

It is obviously more of an art and education project than a real living and cooking space, but the design elements are there; put a roof and a door on it and it would be a lovely tiny house. Take it off the trailer and stack them like a bee hive and you have a community. Just keep the fire extinguisher handy.

Lots more photographs and descriptions at Raymond Olive's website.

Tags: Arts | Less Is More | Small Spaces

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