Jenesys Flatpack Homes: The Real Thing Looks Better Than The Renderings


images credit: Jenesys

Windows can be a problem for architects; We probably use too many of them, not for the light they bring in but for the way they look. But even the best windows have only a fraction of the insulating quality of the walls surrounding them, causing big heat gains and losses. When I first saw Carsten Jensen's designs for the Jenesys Flatpack prefabs three years ago, I I joked that "the more energy-efficient buildings get, the more closely they will resemble walk-in coolers;" The windows on the front facade were really small.

It is a price one pays for energy efficiency, and now that the E Cube is finished, it is clear that in the right hands, it can look very good.

The sunny side of the house has a lot more glazing, for passive solar gain. I am sorry to see that they did not install the sliding sun-shades that were shown on the original rendering.

That is a lot of sunlight!

There are two construction shots that show the beauty of Structural insulated panels; the whole house arrives on a truck;

Then you just stick a big glob of glue on the tongue-and-groove end, tilt it up and stick it together.

Nice kitchen. I do not usually get excited about 2244 square foot suburban houses any more, but Jenesys has smaller models and there are lessons to be learned from this house. More at Jenesys.

The Pluses and Minuses of Vinyl

Architects used to be very careful with windows; they used to be very expensive compared to walls. Then came vinyl, and suddenly houses became more window than wall. If we are going to build homes that we can afford to heat and cool, we are going to have to relearn how to use windows- how big they should be and where should we put them.

More on Windows
The Pluses and Minuses of Vinyl
Noooo Edinburgh, Don't Lift Ban on Changing Windows in Historic Structures
Building the Green Modern Home: Looking at Windows

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Tags: Architects | Green Building | Vancouver