Striking Recycled Art Sculptures Double as Habitat for Solitary Bees

Zen Industrial/Screen capture

Wild pollinators are in almost as much trouble as their domesticated honeybee counterparts. And one of the reasons is that we are all a little too tidy in our gardens.

By removing logs, dead trees and other debris, we are destroying prime habitat for solitary bees and other insects. But fret not—we have options. From sand banks on green roofs for ground-dwelling bees to a 5 star hotel for all kinds of insects, TreeHugger has featured plenty of creative solutions for artificial habitat that don't involve either leaving your garden in a mess or putting up one of those folksy but rather plain bee boxes you see in garden centers and advertised online.

But here's another striking approach to bee habitat created by Tucson artist and lanscape architect Greg Corman, under the brand name of Zen Industrial. Working with recycled steel and wood, Corman has created a series of "bee condos" that just happen to also be unique works of art. EAch piece is drilled with small tunnels—often hundreds of them—which become a home for baby bees.

Zen Industrial/Screen capture

From his abstract owls series to 7ft tall custom steel sculptures, it seems Corman is as prolific as he is committed to helping out our pollinator friends. Here's a little more from his website:

My passion is creating sculpture, outdoor furniture, and practical objects from salvaged materials. Some of my garden pieces are native bee condos: they are drilled with small tunnels that provide nesting habitat for docile bees like leafcutters, mason, and resin bees (NOT honeybees!). My landscape designs emphasize local plants that thrive off irrigation. I create simple, sculptural, and elegant gardens that are ecologically sound and easy-care.

Tags: Arizona | Artists | Arts | Bees | Biodiversity | Insects | United States

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