Smart Light Sydney: Seeing the Light Whilst Reducing the Energy

Sydney, Australia was the city that pioneered Earth Hour, turning off its lights to highlight the energy issues inherent in the climate change dilemma. Now, and for the next three weeks they are turning the lights on for the same cause. Smart Light Sydney is about celebrating "sustainable innovations and the future of low-energy lighting design."

An element of the larger Vivid Sydney festival, Smart Light Sydney is also running a eco lighting symposia looking at how "new technologies such as LEDs, nano-materials and advanced software design programs are revolutionising the design of light fittings and their usage in the city." All the while asking the question, "How can architects design [...] the after dark usage and enjoyment of the city's public spaces and buildings without wasting energy?"

Part of the answer might be found in the Light Walk exhibit, which includes, amongst many others, Cycle! "an interactive and fun light art installation, allowing visitors to power the art work through pedalling bikes linked to generators."

And part of the broader Vivid Sydney, Brian Eno, is painting the Opera House with lights (top), whilst other artists daub structures like the old Customs House (above).

The Property Council of Australia are supporting the event by a switch-off lights campaign,which sees some of the major properties located within the Light Walk precinct, turning off lights normally left burning, so as to offset the low levels of energy being used by the Light Walk's installations and ensure the event creates a minimal environmental impact.


::Smart Light Sydney.

Photos: Smart Light Sydney and Vivid Sydney. Opera House (Orange) and Customs House (Red) by David Clare.

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Tags: Australia | Electricity | Energy Efficiency | Lighting

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