"Luminous Ceilings" of Lighting, Made From Recycled Airplane Panels

© Paul Coudamy

Converting old airplanes into luxury suites or hostels doesn't seem too much of a stretch of the imagination, but deconstructing them further, French designer Paul Coudamy cuts them open and transforms them into modular lighting with a touch of aviation glamour.

© Paul Coudamy

Created for the Flown, an airline furniture company, the 'F-Light' is made from the cutaway interior panels of decommissioned Airbus A300's. According to Flown's website, the design is an homage to the highest ideals of aviation design:

The plane is a masterpiece of functionalism and rationality, which brings alone brings together the biggest thoughts on design, ergonomics, and proportion.

Each element is designed so that Man can sit, eat, rest, play, and organized in airborne flight relatively compact, built to accommodate several hundred passengers.

© Paul Coudamy

© Paul Coudamy

According to Designboom, the F-Light's "engineered curves" are re-conceived as an elevated dome of light that is suspended from the ceiling, with two sets of lights recessed from within each window providing an even and diffuse light.

The original insulation on the panels also helps to reflect the light.

© Paul Coudamy

Thanks to the original design of the airplane, the system is modular and can be expanded to fit any size room.

© Paul Coudamy

It's a clever re-use; by adapting this structural element and changing its orientation, the F-Light takes the futuristic spirit of airplane design and is translated into a "luminous ceiling" for the room it is placed in. For more information, see the designer's and Flown's website (in French).

Tags: Airplanes | Lighting | Recycling