The sharing economy comes into the commercial kitchen

Manning canning
© Manning Canning

It's that time of year when people are canning like mad. Some people have got really good at it, and might even consider setting up a table at the farmers' market and selling their product, but in most places they can't. For health and safety reasons, food that is sold to the public has to be prepared in a proper kitchen that has the right equipment for cooling and storage, triple sinks for washing dishes, proper exhaust hoods over ranges and regular inspections from the health authorities.

That's why Christine Manning has such a good idea here: a commercial kitchen that people can rent when they need it. She's on Kickstarter raising money to equip the kitchen, to be built in mid-town Toronto. It's " general purpose with a ten-burner stove, convection oven, deep fryer, salamander, industrial dish washer, ice maker and small wares. It will be available 24/7 with plenty of prep space." She's also building a new kitchen for her own business, Manning Canning, which she will rent out as well when she isn't cooking.

It hits all of the buttons, but will it work?

There are hundreds of caterers, dozens of food trucks and countless aspiring food-producers in the city. Using our own network, as well as social media, content marketing and online advertising campaigns, we are confident we can get the word out and meet our revenue targets in short order.

It's under halfway to the goal of $35,000, which doesn't surprise me since you don't really get anything for your pledge other than the satisfaction of knowing that you helped out (unless you donate $8,000, in which case you get a very pretty 1966 MG Midget) but it is a terrific idea, a great way for people to get started in the food business without the huge outlay for commercial cooking equipment. Every city should have one of these.

More on Kickstarter

Tags: Product Service Systems | Toronto


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