Two New Cancer Studies Point to Seaweed and Sunlight For Prevention


Photo: FearfulStills

Recent University of South Carolina (USC) studies have outlined two important tools in cancer prevention. The studies, which were carried out at USC's Arnold School of Health and the South Carolina Cancer Center, found that seaweed and sunlight both had a huge impact on cancer prevention, according to The State. Prevention has been at the center of USC's recent cancer studies and seaweed and sunlight are getting some serious attention.

With regards to sunlight and Vitamin D:

Sixty percent of the African-American women in this study diagnosed with breast cancer had low levels of Vitamin D, while 15 percent of the white women did. And vitamin D levels were lowest among those with the most aggressive cancer.

Women in the U.S. are four times as likely to get breast cancer when compared to Japan, a country where seaweed is a regular part of their diet. This led to seaweed becoming the focus of another study.

According to the article:

Seaweeds are remarkably effective at preventing breast cancer in lab studies using cancer cells in test tubes and in studies of animals given seaweed along with a carcinogen. When [a leading researcher in the study Jane] Teas gave capsules of seaweed to healthy American women, she saw significant protective changes in hormones related to breast cancer.

And just like in Jeff Kart's recent article, I was thrilled to see some work on prevention. I wrote over on Planet Green about Christina Pirello and some of her recommendations for prevention like cutting alcohol intake to special occasions and avoiding processed foods and yo-yo dieting.

More on Cancer
Ask Pablo: Does Sunscreen Cause More Skin Cancer Than It Prevents? (Updated)
Breast Cancer Possibly Linked to Air Pollution
Green Eyes On: Avoiding Cancer Everyday of Your Life

Tags: Cancer

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