Rebranding Poop as a Resource - The Poop Project


Image credit: The Poop Project

Whether looking at the selective flush and letting it mellow or recycling our poop for sustainable farming, it's no secret that I believe rethinking the way we handle our bodily waste—both human and animal—is one of the most urgent tasks facing humankind. So when commenter The Puru left a note on my review about Gene Logsdon's new guide to managing manure, alerting me to a project that aims to "rebrand poop as a resource" using art, performance and humor, I just had to check it out.The idea behind the Poop Project (aka The People's Own Organic Power Project) is to tackle our society's fecal phobia head on. Covering everything from peeing on your plants to first-hand accounts of the World Toilet Summit and World Toilet Day, The Puru's project manages to straddle that fine line between keeping it fun, and delivering a very serious message.

But this is far from just a blog. The Puru "aka Shawn" is also a performance artist, and has been creating events that aim to shake up our collective attitude to poop and what we do with it:

"Shawn "the Puru" Shafner is an artist, theatre-maker and educator who started The POOP Project in April 2010 to generate public conversations about our often private business, and encourage people to re-examine their relationship to the bodily function that dare not speak its name. Shawn and The POOP Project team aim to break through the thick walls of euphemism, utilizing public performances and art exhibitions, educational workshops, advocacy and community projects to create "poop positive" space where it never was before."

Thank you The Puru, and keep doing what you do do. You make my toilet-obsession look practically normal.

More on Composting, Manure, and Human Bodily Waste
Is Recycling Our Poop Key to Sustainable Farming?
Is Male Pee Better than Female Pee? The Compost Conundrum.
Manure Runoff and Amish Farming Raising EPA's Ire
The Selective Flush: If it's Yellow, Let it Mellow

Tags: Bacteria | Biology | Recycling | United States | Water Conservation