It's Not Too Late to Plant a Fall Garden! What to Plant in Your Region Now

Photo Credit: themissiah, Flickr Creative Commons Attribution License.

Fall gardening is rewarding in a way that can be hard to explain. You get to plant and harvest in cooler weather, which is always nice. But it's more than that. The variety of things you can harvest that you weren't able to during the heat of summer, the return of cool-season veggies such as spinach and lettuce -- both of these are reason enough. But there's also the sense that you're getting the most from your garden, and that's always a good feeling when you're striving to eat as locally and sustainably as possible.

What to Plant Now in Your Region

Below, you'll find recommended veggies to plant now, based on which region you live in. These are all vegetables that you can direct sow, and that will likely produce a harvest before winter weather sets in.

Vegetables to Sow Now: Northern Regions

Pacific Northwest:
  • Arugula
  • Bok Choy
  • Collard Greens
  • Lettuce
  • Mache
  • Mustard Greens
  • Radishes
  • Spinach
Central/Rocky Mountains
  • Arugula
  • Lettuce
  • Mache
  • Spinach
Midwest
  • Arugula
  • Collard Greens
  • Lettuce
  • Mache
  • Mustard Greens
  • Peas
  • Radishes
  • Spinach
  • Turnips
Northeast
  • Arugula
  • Carrots
  • Lettuce
  • Mache
  • Mustard Greens
  • Radishes
  • Spinach
  • Turnips

Vegetables to Sow Now: Southern Regions

Photo Credit: Photofarmer, Flickr Creative Commons Attribution License. Southwest
  • Arugula
  • Beets
  • Bok Choy
  • Carrot
  • Collard Greens
  • Kale
  • Kohlrabi
  • Leeks
  • Lettuce
  • Mustard Greens
  • Parsnips
  • Peas
  • Radishes
  • Spinach
  • Swiss Chard
  • Turnips
Southeast
  • Beans
  • Beets
  • Collard Greens
  • Cucumbers
  • Kale
  • Kohlrabi
  • Lettuce
  • Mustard Greens
  • Peas
  • Radishes
  • Summer Squash
  • Turnips

These are general suggestions for veggies you can sow now for a fairly quick harvest (especially for those gardeners in northern areas.) In suggesting the above crops, I chose those that would be ready to harvest quickly and that grow well in cooler weather and shorter days. If you're unsure about whether you have enough time to grow a particular variety, find your first frost date, then check your seed packet for the "days to maturity" or "days to harvest." This will tell you if you can expect a harvest from that particular variety before your first fall frost.

So, if you've been thinking that it's too late to put in a garden, rest assured there's still time to grow plenty of fresh food before the gardening season ends.

More About Vegetable Gardening:
Top 10 Most Nutritious Vegetables and How to Grow Them
No Green Thumb? Try Growing These 3 Easy Vegetables

Tags: Gardening

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