Is Healthcare in America Green?


Image from floridashealth.com

Is there anything right about healthcare in the United States? If you judged the industry by everything politicians are saying nowadays, my guess is that you'd say no. As I've listened to the debate over the last few months, it seems so bad that I'm wonder why we're not all dropping dead in the streets. I mean, I know that we're all dying in that existential-self-realized way...but the news from the talking heads in Congress and the White House has got me thinking the outlook is, well, bleak! Not only that, it seems like all of Washington believes only they can fix the problem. So I decided to find out if there's any good news from the world of doctors and nurses. Turns out, there's more than you might think. Healthcare Insurance costs are too high and the number of uninsurance in the US is unacceptable, but believe it or not, the fine men and women that have dedicated their lives to health and human services have been quite busy doing lots of stuff to green healthcare. Below are just a few of the ways health providers are making the world a better place.

Going Green" in the Mid-Atlantic — Sustainable Healthcare
This EPA site helps visitors better understand the ways healthcare impacts the environment as well as outlines easy ways to improve on environmental stewardship for hospitals.

It also has an announcement for nominations for the Trail Blazer Award to be given to hospitals in the Mid-Atlantic Regional for working to move the industry toward sustainable operations in the areas of leadership and organizational commitment, innovation, sustainability, and the potential of being replicated at other organizations.


Image from Coding Horror
Hospital Energy Alliance
The Hospital Energy Alliance (HEA) brings together leading hospitals and national associations in a strategic alliance designed to promote evidence-based information on successful strategies for integrating advanced technologies or processes that will reduce the energy consumption and operating costs of healthcare facilities.

The organization has goals such as to harness the advanced technologies, analytical tools, and capabilities emerging from DOE and the national energy laboratories, to validate the energy and carbon reduction efforts of the nation's hospitals to both internal and external audiences, including the financial community and to help DOE shape future R&D; by clarifying the business needs and drivers unique to the hospital sector.

HEA sees opportunities in the current economic downturn because facilities can institute new thinking to create game changers such as rethinking the design and operation of hospitals to develop net-zero energy buildings; improving energy standards, codes, and regulations for hospitals; and improving technology procurement for hospitals, cross-coordinated with other energy alliances.

Tags: Activism | Diseases | Health Care | Natural Disasters