Architectural installation creates sweet songs for children at lullaby factory

© studio weave

The Lullaby Factory is a quirky and eccentric musical installation at a children's hospital in London. Created in the useless space between a new and old part of the hospital, music can be heard through the left-over pipes on the side of the buildings.

Designed by Studio Weave, architects known for their endearing and innovative creations, it is meant to offer a secret musical world to children (and adults and staff) inside the hospital.

© studio weave

The installation is an interesting mix of the old industrial heritage of the building plus the new musical instruments in the form of giant brass horns. The architects chose to emphasize the existing elements of the space: old and oddly shaped pipes and fixtures and the 1930's brick wall, rather than hide them.

© studio weave

They even include gauges reclaimed from a hospital boilerhouse that was in the process of being dismantled.

© studio weave

The creation covers the full 10 storeys in height and is 32 metres in length. The architects did not want to block any of the existing light in the tight space between the old and new building.

© studio weave

They have created a magical Lullaby Factory. As they explain:

it is manufacturing and releasing gentle, beautiful lullabies to create a calming and uplifting environment for the young patients to recover in.
The children can hear the music through giant bronze listening pipes or from the wards by tuning into a special radio station.

© studio weave

So what about those lullabies? They were composed by a sound artist who wrote a brand new lullaby especially for the project.

It's British eccentricity at its best:


Before any lullabies can be built, we need to collect the base ingredients. The two main collection tools are the Whistful Fillment Filaments, and the Satellite Lilters. The Whistful Fillment Filaments are very long invisible grasses that reach up from the rooftops and comb the air for wishes, the most important ingredients. The second tools are the Lilters that lie high up in the sky and listen to the planetary music. Planetary music is the undetectable basis for all music and dreams and it was the invention of Lilters that allowed the earliest dream factories to be set up. The Lilters can detect the planetary music and communicate it down to the factory by a sort of singing with their Lollips.

Tags: Architecture | Health Care | Kids | London

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