Skinny makeover lights up 7-foot wide house

© Alma-nac

We've covered more than a few skinny houses before, noting that they're one way to achieve higher urban densities while still allowing families to have a house to call their own, and if renovated right, could present significant savings in energy consumption.

© Alma-nac

British architects Alma-nac redid this cramped and dingy terraced house in St John's Hill, Clapham, London, that measures only 2.3 metres (7.5 feet) wide -- built over what was once a lane between two houses.

© Alma-nac

To bring natural daylighting to the center of the house, the designers added an extension of space to the house's rear, and staggered the three floors underneath a sloping roof.

The distinctive roof is punctuated with big skylights to let light in, thus creating an effective light-well. Similarly, the stairwell to the upper floors is flooded with light from above, and the skylights can be opened to create a stack effect to naturally ventilate the house. The extension at the back, hidden from the skinny building's unassuming front, meant that a more spacious dining area, a lead-out to the garden, extra bedroom and study could be added.

© Alma-nac
© Alma-nac
© Alma-nac
© Alma-nac

The continuously running slate roof is a nice, longer-lasting touch as well, compared to petroleum-based conventional roofing products. Inside, interior storage was also carefully reorganized, say the architects on Dezeen:

A key consideration was storage space and every corner of the property has been utilised, from the bed-head with integrated storage, loft space over the top bedroom and compact bathroom layouts. The elongated form of the main bedroom at first floor level allowed for the creation of a dressing room area so that the bedroom space remains uncluttered of furniture. The design of the roof build-up ensured the minimum depth (250mm) in order to maximise the space internally and achieving a high U-value (0.14 W/m2K) [coefficient of heat transmission].

© Alma-nac
© Alma-nac

More over at Dezeen and Alma-nac.

Tags: Architecture | Less Is More | London | Small Spaces

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