Tiny, Winter-Proofed, 215 Sq. Ft. Leaf House Fits Family of Four

© Laird Herbert

From mortgage-free shotgun houses to under-the-radar Finnish micro-cabins, there's a wide range of tiny homes that are built for various reasons. Whitehorse, Canada resident and tiny home builder Laird Herbert has launched a line of tiny homes designed specifically to take on cold northern winters.

© Laird Herbert

Made to fit a family of four, Laird arrived at this modern, FSC wood-built, second version of his mobile "Leaf House" after several prototypes. It boasts recycled materials, natural finishes and eco-friendly building products inside and out, and features a tin roof that is sloped to shed snow, and also doubles as a lofted sleeping space. Says Herbert:

In my mind, the leaf house epitomizes the creativity of the owner-built home. It is what happens when we look at building beyond the conventional norms - beyond stick framing and vinyl siding; beyond the real estate market; beyond housing simply as a means to make a buck.

© Laird Herbert

In addition to a 35-gallon (132-liter) water storage unit, pull-out sofa bed, overall there's 215 square feet of space in its 20-foot length that is packed with a lot of eco-friendly features. Here are more details from Jetson Green:

It was built with FSC tongue and groove cedar siding, metal siding, triple-pane Northern Windows, steel stud construction, spray foam insulation, Energy Shield wrap, low-VOC wood finishes and paint, a Sun-Mar composting toilet, GE propane range, Kohler sink, Pegasus shower, tankless water heating, Ecoheat electric baseboards, Broan ventilation, LEDs, dimmable CFLs, birch plywood and ultralight drywall finishing, etc.

© Laird Herbert
© Laird Herbert
© Laird Herbert

Leaf House Version.2 is currently on the market for CAD$44,500 (US$43,429) -- but according to Gizmag, it costs Herbert CAD $40,000 to build -- so it's priced pretty reasonably, considering. Herbert also does customized versions; check out Tiny Housing for more details.

© Laird Herbert

Tags: Architecture | Less Is More