96 Sq. Foot Finnish Micro-Cabin Built Small To Forego Permits

© Robin Falck

The image of a secluded cabin in the woods recalls the simple, idealistic idyll of Henry David Thoreau's Walden, free of the impositions of society. This beautiful micro-cabin, built beside a lake in Finland, was constructed to go under the radar of Finnish building regulations, which require one to get a permit for anything that is larger than 96 to 128 square feet, depending on the district.

© Robin Falck

Anticipating a one-year stint in the military, owner Robin Falck decided to design a cabin that wouldn't require getting tangled in bureaucratic red tape. Built with a 50 square foot loft above for sleeping and storage, and a ground floor lounge/living area and kitchen and bathroom, the house is designed to maximize the allowed area, plus boosting the capacity for great acoustics and natural daylighting. In addition to the tall window, there's an adjacent deck for a great view of the tranquil surroundings.

© Robin Falck

On Tiny House Listings, he talks about his cabin, which he has dubbed "Nido" (or "bird's nest" in Italian):

A couple years back in 2009 I got this idea of an cabin/small house that would be small enough to be built without the need of a permit. In Finland it’s 96-128 sq. ft. (depending on where you are). So I started daydreaming about different possibilities and didn’t really believe that I would one day actually build it.

Well, a year later, suddenly, after almost forgetting the whole idea I got obsessed and set out to actually design it. Probably a combination of the fact that my military service was approaching and after sketching and calculating it seemed so possible.

© Robin Falck

Winter of 2009/2010 I spent designing and planning the house. I contacted a couple of architects that were really kind to help out with some of the more technical stuff.

Then came summer and the construction began. I had already chosen the place and had it in mind when designing the cabin. On June the 5th I started and 2 weeks later the only thing missing where the window and door which arrived a couple weeks later.

© Robin Falck

Best of all, Falck says that he was able to find recycled materials for the majority of the construction, and he estimates that the cost was somewhere around US $10,500 plus labour, which isn't too bad for a photogenic little lakeside shelter such as this. More over at Tiny House Listings.

Tags: Architecture