Brick rubble to be reused in Nepal earthquake relief housing, says Shigeru Ban

Shigeru Ban
© Shigeru Ban

Japanese architect and recent Pritzker Prize winner Shigeru Ban announced back in May that he would be part of the humanitarian effort in rebuilding post-earthquake Nepal. In addition to employing his signature cardboard tube architecture, Ban has announced that he intends to re-use brick rubble from the disaster, in order to speed up the rebuilding process.

© Shigeru Ban

According to Designboom, Ban's design for relief housing will consist of a modular wooden framework measuring 3 feet by 7 feet. Immediate occupation will be made possible by tossing temporary tarps over the structure, which will allow residents and builders to rebuild at their pace, using rubble or other materials for the infill. Walls could be then mortared with whatever is locally available.

© Shigeru Ban

The roof will be supported by a cardboard tube truss system, connected with wood pieces.

© Shigeru Ban
© Shigeru Ban

Ban studied traditional Nepalese methods of building, and used this research in the design of the operable window frames. Ban's team has erected an initial prototype in Japan, and plan to implement the design in Nepal soon. For the long-term, there are plans to implement some sort of prefabricated housing, which the architect has done before in the Philippines.

© Shigeru Ban

It's a clever idea to literally transform the rubble of destruction into new, hopeful habitats for survivors of the devastating quake. For more info, visit Shigeru Ban.

Tags: Architecture | Natural Disasters | Nepal | Recycled Building Materials

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