Nest-Like Treehouse Uses Glue-Laminated Timber (Video)

© Jerry Tate Architects

Tree-inspired architecture can take many forms -- from modern prefab to rustic, from long-lasting to the more transient, to even treeless treehouses. Perched in the arms of a mature oak tree, this small, temporary treehouse in Devon, England is a the result of a five-day collaboration between London-based Jerry Tate Architects, carpenter Henry Russell and a small group of students.

© Jerry Tate Architects
© Jerry Tate Architects

Spotted over at Dezeen, this lightweight tree platform was completed as part of Dartmoor Arts Week and sited on a local farm, taking its inspiration from the nests of weaver birds, says Tate:

The form was inspired by a weaver bird’s nest which looks dramatic but is safe and secure. Nature is a sublime designer.

© Jerry Tate Architects

Measuring 10 square meters (108 square feet), the covered walkway bridges over a slope towards a 1.8 meter (6 foot) circular seating area perched in the oak, which will allow the clients' grandchildren to sit and enjoy the open view.

© Jerry Tate Architects
© Jerry Tate Architects

Locally harvested spruce, western red cedar and larch were milled on-site for use; in particular, thin layers of spruce were glue-laminated into structural 'ribs' which are formed or woven to provide shelter. Only two mechanical connections were placed into the tree to minimize damage, while stability is derived mostly from the placement of the structural elements.

© Jerry Tate Architects

An impressive intervention for five days and costing only £600 (US $951); more over at Jerry Tate Architects and check out the process video below from Dezeen.

Dartmoor Treehouse by Jerry Tate Architects from Dezeen on Vimeo.

Tags: Architecture | United Kingdom

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