Charming microhomes built with salvaged heritage lumber

© Charles Finn

Custom-built tiny homes are as unique as snowflakes, depending on the motivations and predilections of the creator. So far, we've seen winter-worthy mobile tiny homes, "pure salvage" microhomes built entirely from demolished buildings. For American tiny house builder and author Charles Finn, it was the proportional poetry, efficiency and simplicity of traditional Japanese tea houses that first got him thinking about building small.

© Charles Finn

The Tiny House Blog quotes Finn describing the ideas behind his first structure in Lloyd Kahn's Tiny Homes book:

The entire cabin began with a daydream of wide windowsills so my cat, 42, could sit and look out. The next winter I built a second and towed it into Missoula to show at a Farmer’s Market. It sold to the very first person who cycled by, along with a promise to create another.

© Charles Finn

By now, the Vermont native was living in Potomac, Montana, and that's where Finn began his tiny house building career, with this first official tiny home, the "Potomac Cabin." Measuring 8 by 12 feet and coming with a 5-foot loft, this little house was made entirely with recovered barn lumber and metal siding.

© Charles Finn
© Charles Finn

Each of his microhomes are custom-made with its own style and choice of local materials -- much of it reclaimed heritage lumber -- and are a way to help folks live simpler but richer lives. Two of Finn's clients are quoted on his blog as saying:

Charles Finn’s cabins spoke to our souls from the minute we first visited one. They answered our desire for a simpler life and a small, energy-efficient space that touched the land lightly, incorporated recycled materials, and honored our rural building traditions. His designs revealed a great sense of craftsmanship and matched our aesthetic sensibilities perfectly. The two micro-cabins he built for us have become our refuge and sanctum.

© Charles Finn
© Charles Finn
© Charles Finn

If you're in the market for a custom-built micro-cabin, check out Charles' site -- smaller houses like the Blue Room (pictured below) will cost around USD $14,000 while a structure similar to the Potomac Cabin would be priced at USD $22,000. More over at the Tiny House Blog and Charles Finn's blog A Room of One's Own.

© Charles Finn

Tags: Architecture | Less Is More | Living With Less | Small Spaces