Architects Renovate a Tiny House and Keep It Tiny, Modern and Classic

© Atelier Drome

Michelle Linden and Henry Walters of Atelier Drome write about their philosophy:

As architects and designers, we believe in encouraging green sustainable building and design, understanding that our resources are precious. We get excited about creating intelligent solutions, rather than bigger solutions, and strongly believe that a thoughtfully designed project will have less impact on the earth, help foster positive relationships, and ultimately enhance the owners' lives.

They certainly have created an intelligent, rather than bigger situation here in their Ravenna Remodel in Seattle.

© Atelier Drome

They describe the project:

While this home was very small, the clients did not want to increase the footprint, but rather increase the usability of the spaces.... a new sliding glass door in the 2nd bedroom/office was added to the exterior, with a folding wall system separating the room from the main living area. This allows the owners to open the entire space to the exterior, but still provides privacy to the bedroom when needed.

The result is a very tight, efficient floor plan with lots of storage, as the owners are "avid collectors."

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It is actually nice to see stuff in the house; usually architects go all minimalist and fluff it within an inch of its life, you don't see anything. Here you actually get Corb's LC4 Chaise Longue, but also a big desk with someone actually working at it.

© Atelier Drome

The architects described the project in an email:

Obviously, the most green aspect of the project is its size. At only 600sf, we're using less materials for construction and significantly less energy to run the home. But, we also tried to include other sustainable design features including salvaged materials (oak flooring for the kitchen, wood sliding glass door, wall oven and microwave, framing lumber, and baseboard trim), energy efficient appliances (combo washer/dryer, on-demand water heater), and added insulation.

© Atelier Drome

The architect selected light colored paint and large windows to help keep the brick fireplace from overpowering the small space. Dark floors give it a modern edge and help ground the space.

It is an odd mix, the brick fireplace from the 50s era and the Miesian 1929 Barcelona chairs from an even earlier one. Eclectic and fun.

More at Atelier Drome, found on Homedit

Tags: Architects | Less Is More | Seattle