April Fools Day Roundup

Some of us (well, maybe just me) love April Fools Day, and have been writing posts about it for years. Who can forget the Earthquake and Fire Proof Floating Houses Coming to Los Angeles

"We're going to zone the skies above Los Angeles for floating buildings," said city planning spokesperson Z. Rowe Gees. "These structures, called Strat-Houses, will be modeled after the old dirigibles, over a thousand feet long. Unlike zeppelins such as the Hindenburg, they will not be carried aloft by explosive hydrogen. The Strat-Houses will be supported by nacelles filled with helium."

LEED Introduces Protactinium Level



LEED has unveiled a new level of certification, Protactinium.

In order to qualify for the standard, building designers must commit to a lifetime of celibacy and staff the building exclusively with doe-eyed orphans from third world countries. The building must be a net CO2 sink, producing more oxygen than it consumes. Any bamboo used in construction must be certified panda-free. In the event that straw bale construction is used, the straw must be free-range, sustainably harvested straw.


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Local and Seasonal Food: The Spaghetti Harvest


It is important to remember that slow and local food is deeply embedded within traditional ways of life. One of the earliest and most important documentaries on local food and cultural practices was the famous 1957 Panorama documentary by cameraman Charles De Jaeger and producer David Wheeler on the Alpine spaghetti harvest. This classic was one of the first studies of the importance of climate (there was a really mild winter that year), culture and food, rolled into two minutes of cinematic history. Presenter Richard Dimbleby notes that 'After picking, the spaghetti is laid out to dry in the warm, alpine sun"


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New Study Proves EMF Affects Living Things, Discovers Electro-bonsai Effect


There has been much discussion at TreeHugger about the danger of Electromagnetic Fields (EMF) generated by cellphones, routers, power lines and microwave ovens. Some people think it is a serious issue; WIFI is banned at Lakehead University, and in Scandinavia there are cellphone-free beaches for people with electro-hypersensitivity. Clarins even makes a spray to protect your skin from it. Other people feel that it is not a problem.

Treehugger Labs wanted to determine this once and for all, and has spent the past year studying the issue. We wanted to pick a life form that would not move around a lot so that we could ensure that there were no other factors, and we are, of course, against animal testing, so we chose trees as our subject. We searched for trees that grew near power lines to see what the effect of the EMF was on the form of the tree.

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Do You Need A Computer?


This is a continuing debate in TreeHugger headquarters; questioning the boat anchor that is the modern webworker career. Many TreeHugger writers have not forgiven Graham for tying them down to computers at desks and in coffee shops when they used to take their pens and lined steno pads anywhere at any time. They yearn for the mobility and freedom that came from working at home, in the barn, in that garret in Paris, before they were tied into that insidious web. We have to ask, are computers a curse?

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Tags: Humor