World's First Color e-Reader Launched By Fujitsu


Photo via Fujistu

Fujitsu opened up online sales today for the world's first color e-reader. The device, called FLEPia, looks pretty slick! The basics:

In addition to being lightweight and thin, the color e-paper mobile terminal features an easy-to-view 8-inch display screen capable of showing up to 260,000 colors in high-definition, in addition to being equipped with Bluetooth and high-speed wireless LAN. FLEPia is also power-efficient, enabling up to 40 hours of continuous battery operation when fully charged, and does not require power for continuous display of a screen image, consuming power only during re-draw.

If you pop in a 4GB memory card, you can store as many as 5,000 e-books. It's also touch screen, which is a boon to people who are getting used to maneuvering through a device like a smart phone without the hassles of buttons.

And what might you pay for this "world's first," you're surely wondering. Well, surprisingly not more than the price of many other high-end e-readers, about $1,000. Though that's far, far more than what you'll pay for a quality e-reader with black-n-white e-paper that'll get the job done just fine for now. You can currently pre-order it in Japan (for shipping on Aprill 20th), but we have no idea when it'll hit in North America yet. The company hopes to sell 50,000 of them over the next two years, so it will hopefully arrive soon.

Color e-paper in e-readers are the next big thing, since it will allow people to read text books and newspapers that feature colored graphs, photos and other things that really need color to make their statement. As e-ink technology improves, we'll see color e-paper in more and more devices.

Via Fujistu
More on e-Readers
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A New eReader on the Scene: Astak's EZ Reader
CES 2009: The ASTAK EZ Reader
Could the Next Textbook Upgrade be a Kindle?

Tags: Books | Electronics | Energy Efficiency | Gadgets | Newspapers

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