Vintage Circuit Boards Transformed Into Incredible Sculptures

Images via Wired

We've seen our fair share of art made from circuit boards -- even a Mona Lisa made of motherboards. But the sculptures by artist Theo Kamecke take the cake. Using the beauty often overlooked in patterns and colors of circuitry, he creates some gorgeous pieces worthy of galleries. And even though the raw material is very much man-made, Kamecke says it still conjures up the beauty we see in whorls of seashells or the grain of wood. And it's true -- as you look at his art, it reminds you of the careful chiseling done by craftsmen centuries ago on cabinets, chests, and other furniture. In fact, he even uses a technique popular with furniture makers. According to Wired, Kamecke harvests the etching from the boards, and affixes them to hardwood so it looks like polished metal on stone. Using a technique called marquetry that he's modified to suit his medium and style, he creates pieces that look both ancient and modern simultaneously. He's the only one who makes pieces like this.

Starting in the 1980s, Kamecke started collecting vintage circuit boards with a mind to turning them into art. He wanted to use vintage because they were often handmade, and therefore more interesting to look at, he says. And indeed, he makes them into something worthy of being stared at.

According to his bio, "Kamecke's sculpture has been exhibited in more than 40 individual and group shows since the 1980's and is represented in corporate, institutional, private, and museum collections internationally. His work has also been the subject of many publications internationally. His studio is in the Catskill Mountains north of New York City."

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Tags: Artists | Electronics | Recycling


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