This gadget repairs flat bike tires in 60 seconds, without having to remove the wheel

There's nothing like a flat tire to bring a bike ride to a screeching halt (short of an accident), but this invention could have you back in the saddle in less than a minute after a flat.

After you learn how to ride a bike (or get started riding again), one of the next things you ought to learn is how to patch a tire. Patching a bicycle tube isn't very difficult, but it does require a bit of time and some know-how, plus the ability to pull off your wheel to make the repair.

However, an innovative bike accessory aims to make the flat repair process as quick and easy as possible, by allowing cyclists to patch a flat tire in about a minute, without removing the wheel.

If the Patchnride device works as claimed, it could be the one gadget you never want to leave home without (at least when you're on your bike), because it could reduce the amount of time necessary to patch a flat tire from as long as 20 minutes (if you're a bit on the slow side), to just 60 seconds, allowing you to keep rolling with a minimal amount of fuss.

As you can see from the video, using the Patchnride device is dead simple, as all it requires is knowing where the hole is, at which point the device can be inserted into the tire, just above the hole in the tube. A simple push and twist with the device will insert the patch, and then the tire can be reinflated (you did remember to bring your pump with you, didn't you?).

The Patchnride is designed to work for holes up to 3mm in size in tubular, clincher, mountain bike, cruiser bike, tubeless, and jogging stroller tires, and tubes can be patched multiple times. The device measures about 5 inches long, and weighs less than 100 grams, making it easy to keep with you on a ride, and the only drawback apparent to me is that it uses single-use patch pods (each pod is only good for one patch).

"The great thing about patchnride is that its simplicity makes it perfect for a serious cyclist or triathlete as well as cruising types or parents. It’s a product that’s never existed before, and we’re ecstatic to bring it to the market." - Alexander Deiser, Co-Founder of patchnride

According to the website, the Patchnride will "help save the environment by reducing your carbon footprint," because it allows users to patch the tube instead of tossing it.

To my way of thinking, it's not nearly as green as they might claim, because most of us don't throw away a tube just because of a single hole (I've patched tubes as many as 6 times before replacing them), and there are plenty of good uses for old tubes once they've reached the end of their useful life. Plus, now you've got a used patch pod to dispose of, which doesn't look like it lends itself to any sort of reuse, as a bike tube does.

Right now, Patchnride is available for pre-order (to be shipped this fall), and the company is offering the tool, two patch pods and two leak detectors at a special price of $25 (said to be a $50 value). If you're an impatient cyclist, or just hate having to pull your wheel off and remove the tube in order to patch it, the Patchnride might be your new cycling best friend.

Tags: Bike Accessories | Bikes | Gadgets

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