Feed Your Passion for Fixing Things with Sugru

Sugru/Screen capture
In striving for a more sustainable world, not only should we be trying to recycle everything we can, but we should also attempt to reuse items, either for their original function, or as a component to repurposing. Being able to fix things so that they work again, or so that they work better than before, is a valuable skill in our transitional culture, and thanks to a unique product, fixing the world just got a lot easier.

"What does an Olympic athlete have in common with kids putting cameras in space? And what unites a DIY enthusiast with a long-distance canoeist? Or an archer with an MIT researcher? A passion for fixing things."

Sugru is a dream material for life hackers, gadget fixers, prototype builders, fixit gurus, and anyone who's ever thought "I could make this even better." This hand-formable rubber is highly adhesive, air-curable, waterproof, strong, flexible, and durable, and is stable in temperatures ranging from -50°C to +180°C, making it the perfect material for hacking just about anything.

"Developed by a team of product designers and material scientists, sugru's patented technology is unique in its combination of hand-formability, self-adhesion and flexibility when cured. It feels like modelling clay, and it's that easy to use too. Once cured, its durable properties mean it's comfortable in extreme environments from the dishwasher to the ocean in Antarctica."

The Sugru community has grown to approximately 155,000 people in over 100 different countries, and their passion for fixing things has led to some incredible solutions and creations, as evidenced in this celebratory video:

We've published a few really cool Sugru projects here at TreeHugger, such as making an iPad case from an old book, making gadget parts from Sugru and 3D printed molds, and turning a digital camera into a kid's camera, but there are tons of other exciting ideas for using Sugru to fix and hack your stuff at their site.

Sugru comes in various sizes and colors, starting at about $10.

Tags: Do It Yourself | Technology

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