BikeSpike tracks your bike, detects thefts and crashes

© BikeSpike
An interesting new device for bike owners has just launched on Kickstarter, called The BikeSpike. A GPS tracking system with an open platform for reading the information, BikeSpike reveals the what and where of your bike. Not only is it a clever device, but could also change the way we value and monitor bikes as a method of transportation.

For the every day rider, it connects you to the details of your bike, from how you ride to where it is located, including the ability to recover it after theft. As Mashable puts it, it is "like LoJack and OnStar for your bike." But it is also a device that can be perfect for fleets of bikes, such as a team in a race, a bike messenger business, or a bike rental business that needs to keep track of the location, course, speed and other details of multiple bikes.

The BikeSpike can:


  • Monitor your bike's location on a map using your phone or computer
  • Grant temporary access to local law enforcement, helping increase the chances of recovery.
  • Digitally "lock" your bike and receive a notification if your bike moves from it's geo-fenced location or if someone even tampers with it.
  • Collision detection system can alert key members of your contact list and share the location of an accident.
  • Share your stats (distance, speed, and courses...) with friends, coaches and spectators.
  • Monitor your children and get notified if they ride out of their safe zone.
  • Our open API allows developers to create gaming and fitness apps that you can download and use with the device or use the data created from the BikeSpike to integrate with the existing apps you already love. Export a GPX file.
  • PLUS, with the Hacker Pack, you can connect it to a motorcycle or other on-board batteries for a continual charge.

  • The project is on Kickstarter, hoping to raise $150,000 to launch the device.

    Here are more details in this video:

    Tags: Bike Accessories | Concepts & Prototypes | Electronics | Gadgets | Technology

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