Automated bug trap allows for real-time pest monitoring from smartphones

Reducing the amount and frequency of pesticide applications to farm fields and orchards not only helps reduce some of the unintended impact of agricultural practices, but could also save time, labor, and money for the growers.

An automated pest trap and detection system could be one solution for better pest management and higher yields, and this tech innovation from Spensa Technologies is leading the way.

The Z-Trap solution allows for real-time data on the presence of agricultural pests in their orchards, and lets growers monitor the population of these pests right from their phone, no matter where they are.

"Z-Trap provides automatic, real-time trap data from your orchards. Set it up at the beginning of the growing season, and leave it. Monitor pests populations from your laptop and smartphone. Catch problems early. Use less pesticide. Save more fruit." - Spensa Tech

Instead of having to do manual pest counts from traps in the fields, which takes time and labor to do, and which depends on catching the pest population explosion right when it happens, in order to treat them right away, the Z-Trap enables remote detection and monitoring, in real-time.

Growers can set up Z-Traps in their fields, bait them with insect lure, and set alerts for pest population thresholds, so that immediate and precise action can be taken to control them. This allows for lower amounts of pesticides to be applied, instead of a blanket treatment approach, saving the grower money and time.

The Z-Traps connect wirelessly and sync to a monitoring system, the My Traps software, which tracks pest populations and pesticide applications and lets users see their data from the web or their smartphone. Currently, Z-Traps are only designed to monitor codling moths, but the company is working to develop detection for other species as well.

According to Sustainable America, Spensa just received a small grant to investigate the USDA gypsy moth monitoring program, which currently consists of monitoring about 250,000 traps across the Northeast US, many of them in remote areas. If an automated pest detection system such as Z-Traps were integrated into the program, it could end up saving quite a bit of time and money in the fight to keep those forests healthy.

Spensa Technologies has a limited number of starter kits for the upcoming growing season, and interested parties can contact them for more info.

Tags: Agriculture | Technology