Remember, Keystone XL Will Create Scant Few Jobs

Jungbim via Wikimedia Commons/CC BY-NC 2.0

For a $7 billion, 1,700-mile project, the Keystone XL tar sands pipeline will create precious few jobs. That's incredibly important to remember as the oil industry goes into full court press mode in hocking the plan to the American public in coming days. Remember, thanks to the GOP Congress, Obama now has to decide on whether to approve the pipeline by March – and Big Oil has already started making threats and funding expensive campaigns to try to ensure he does.

But just keep in mind TransCanada execs' own words here, when you start seeing jobs numbers like 20,000 or 1 million or whatever the industry is dreaming up at the moment. In fact, just watch this:

Yes, that hundreds of jobs nationwide, not thousands. Here's the NRDC's Danielle Droitsch, who sums up the situation aptly:

You’ll hear the GOP, the American Petroleum Institute, and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce make wild claims about the job creation potential of the Keystone XL tar sands pipeline. Don’t be fooled. The pipeline company itself admits only “a few hundred permanent jobs” are created by Keystone XL. The debate over whether Keystone XL creates jobs is a convenient diversion from something oil company backers don’t want you to know: this is an export pipeline to help them access foreign markets and bypass the United States. Oil companies will make bigger profits and oil prices for Americans will increase. That’s not a project that helps Americans. It’s a project that helps Big Oil.
And bear in mind that the only independent review carried out on the job creation prospects of the pipeline, by Cornell University, found that the project would create a minuscule net 500-1400 permanent jobs. That's certainly not worth the damage the Keystone XL will do to our climate, our pristine environments, and, potentially, the country's largest aquifer.

Say it with me: the Keystone XL is not a serious job creator.

Tags: Canada | Tar Sands | Tar Sands Action | United States

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