LEED Bashing: Plastic People trying to slip "Trojan Horse" amendments to gut LEED certification

trojan horse
Public Domain Trojan Horse

What's not to love about the Energy Savings and Industrial Competitiveness Act? It has strong bipartisan support; Gene Karpinsky in Huffington Post calls it " common-sense legislation that will help American families and businesses across the country save money and use less energy. Along the way, it will create more private-sector jobs, reduce global warming pollution, and decrease our dependence on oil."

But the American High Performane Building Coalition (members here) just wants a little bitty change to it; the pro-plastic lobby group writes:

We support the common objective of improving energy efficiency and environmental performance in buildings, and support and promote green building codes, standards, rating systems and credits that are developed in conformance with full American National Standards Institute (ANSI) or ISO-type consensus processes, are data-driven, supported by science, and performance-based. The purpose of the coalition is not to endorse or oppose any particular green building rating system.

It just so happens that the LEED certification system isn't ANSI. That shouldn't be a deal-breaker; lots of certifications aren't ANSI. Paula Melton explains:

The idea that the ANSI process is the only way to develop a standard by consensus is not accepted by anyone, including the federal government itself—yet the chemical industry, the timber industry, and GBI have all been pushing this same talking point for years.

And guess what? Our favorite sham building certification system, Green Globes, bought and paid for by big lumber and big chem, just happens to be ANSI. The hot poop is that Louisiana Democrat Senator Mary Landrieu is going to introduce the Amendments. Logical choice; she a good friend of the Plastic People. They even bought this ad to tell everyone how much they love her:

And now it's payback time.

Read Paula's much longer explanation at LEEDuser.

Tags: LEED | Plastics

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