Britain's "Green Deal" Shows How Government Money Can Reduce Government Spending

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Britain's Chancellor may have vowed not to lead on CO2 cuts, and elements of the Conservative Party may be rethinking their Heathrow Third Runway opposition.

But there are still good things going on in Britain in terms of environmental politics. And one of the best, and simplest, schemes is known as the Green Deal. Under the scheme, homeowners will be able to access government loans to improve the energy efficiency of their buildings, and use the savings on their energy bill to repay the loan.

Essentially it's just a simple way of using the financial power of the Government to leverage spending by individuals—but to do so in a way that reduces the need for Government spending in the long run.

All too often, here in the US at least, the debate centers around "more government" or "less government", when what really matters is figuring out what government does well and what it doesn't.

And then acting on what you learn. Here Robert Llewellyn of Fully Charged sets out to find out more.

Tags: Activism | Economics | Energy Efficiency | United Kingdom