Energy News: US' First Tar Sands Project Given Green Light, Keystone XL Blockade Enters Second Month, More

Laura Borealis, Tar Sands Blockade/CC BY 2.0

Utah Approves First Commercial Tar Sands Project in US
The Utah Water Quality Board has reject an appeal to stop US Oil Sands Inc from beginning the first commercial tar sands project in the nation, in the Book Cliffs area of the state. SF Gate reports that mining on the 62-acre project will begin late next year.

TransCanada Pipeline Explosion Preceded by Quality Concerns
CBC News reports that an explosion that tore apart a 12-meter section of TransCanada's Bison natural gas pipeline in Wyoming back in July 2011, had concerns about it raised by the US Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration nearly a year before the explosion occurred. Quality concerns were apparently addressed to PHMSA's satisfaction prior to opening the pipeline, even though six months later it would rupture.

Tar Sands Blockade Enters Second Month Protesting Keystone XL Construction
The direct action against preliminary construction of the Keystone XL tar sands pipeline in Texas has entered its second month. For a blow-by-blow account of the actions of the tree-sitters occupying 80' tall trees as forest is cleared for the as-yet-approved pipeline, visit: Tar Sands Blockade.

Thousands of North Sea Oil Spills in Past Decade Have Resulted in Less Than Ten Fines
The Guardian reports the shocking stat that since 2000, there have been 4,123 oil spills associated with drilling for oil in the North Sea, yet only 7 of them have result in fines, with no company receiving citations over £20,000 ($32,000). Mind blowing.

Oil's Supply Boom is Climate Bust
Climate Progress sums up the dire situation:

In the world today, global warming is our collective cancer, and despite dire and clear warnings, the oil industry is still smoking away. The best climate science in the world tells us that in order to avoid the worst impacts of climate change, we need to limit global warming to no more than 2 degrees Celsius. But the amount of new oil production the industry is bringing online over the next eight years is exponentially more than we can afford to burn and stay under two degrees.  We simply cannot afford to burn all the oil that the industry is capable of producing over the next few years, and in the long term.

Tags: Activism | Oil | Oil Spill | Tar Sands | Tar Sands Action