Zig Zag Chair Is Made Out of Just Three Pieces of Plywood

© Randy Weersing

Plywood is pretty rigid; moulded plywood requires big presses and expensive tools. Designer and craftsman Randy Weersing has developed a line of furniture where he cuts and stretches plywood so that it follows the shape of the chair frames, creating this very simple chair. He calls it:

A very comfortable ergonomically sculpted chair. Very light and strong. Constructed of only 3 pieces of high grade micro-ply laminated maple (plywood). A functional, attractive minimalist design.

© Randy Weersing

Weersing writes on his site about environmental issues:

I recognize the need to be kind to our environment and embrace the use of green materials and green practices. While my client's desires are always foremost, the use of local sustainable materials utilizing eco-friendly techniques is strongly encouraged.

Not to mention, getting more out of less as he does with this chair design. I don't know if Randy did this by hand or with a CNC router, but it is a idea that looks like it was made for a computer driven tool.

Custommade/Screen capture

Following the link from Core77, the chair was shown on a site called CustomMade, "the first online marketplace to connect shoppers looking for fine custom home furnishings and other personalized items with the skilled makers who create them." It connects 3500 craftspeople to customers who need stuff; you can choose from their designs or submit your own.

We think everyone should try custom, and we think custom is a better alternative to the things you might already be buying from your local big-business retailer. So we want to create a place where it's easy to interact and transact with custom makers of every kind. The mission is a world where everyone gets everything custom made or customized - or at least considers it!

This is what the Internet is so good at, giving everyone a chance to get exactly what they want or need without Mr. Bigbox telling them what they can have.

Tags: Chairs | Designers | Downloadable Design