Tree bark covered furniture uses traditional methods

© Xerock Kim

We would barely bat an eye at wood as a furniture-making material, but what about bark from the tree? Using a traditional method and an imaginative perspective, South Korean designer Xerock Kim takes the leftover tree bark and puts it to good use by covering this cabinet with this oft-overlooked element.

© Xerock Kim

Called "Accumulation," the cabinet's tree bark skin was naturally dyed using a traditional method found in Korea, and then adhered to its surfaces. The piece is a reflection on how human lives are created as a series of tangible experiences overlaid and accumulated over time, “indivisibly tangled in the complexity of modern society.”

© Xerock Kim
© Xerock Kim
© Xerock Kim

Kim explains the curious motivation behind the piece, a "convergence point between tradition and modernity":

Accumulation aims at dressing hurt trees cut down for furniture manufacture in their intrinsic, natural cloths. [..] Accumulation expresses the diversity of culture and individuals and reinterprets the traditional dying technique to modern-day furniture.

© Xerock Kim

We wonder if there's some way to prevent the bark from flaking off over time, but as in architecture, there's a lot that traditional methods and ways of thinking can bring to the design process -- this rough, tactile but philosophically refined piece attempts just that, while transforming forgotten skins into something beautiful and meaningful again. More over at Xerock Kim's site.

Tags: Furniture | South Korea

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