Manufract: 'Self-healing' salvaged wood furniture made whole with bio-resin

Manufract
© Manufract

In nature, organisms find a way to restore their integrity and equilibrium once they have been injured. Trees are no exception; that's why in treehouse-building, designers have to find less intrusive ways to connect their structures to the main trunk, without harming it too much and allowing for future growth.

German design company Manufract, co-founded by Marcel Dunger (previously) and Florian Meier, took this self-healing concept in mind when designing this series of furniture that mixes salvaged wood furniture that has been "healed" with bio-resins.

Manufract© Manufract

They say:

Inspired by the self-healing process of trees and we created a new and unique design. If a tree gets injured, it will naturally release resin to close the wound. This natural concept of wound-healing is used for the manufacturing process of these products. Broken pieces of wood are form-filled with a novel eco-resin to get the final shape. Each product is unique and crafted out of broken hardwood.

The apparent blemishing of these broken oak woods are transformed into an aesthetic advantage here. The organic cracks are highlighted, rather than hidden, by the eco-friendly filler. The transparency and colours of the bio-resins add a kind of light-filter to the furniture, adding some more function to the modernist form. Here, the blue-tinted bio-resin looks almost like frozen water.

Manufract© Manufract
Manufract© Manufract

The wall shelf here features golden-coloured bio-resin, which looks like real resin, and acts to cast a golden shimmer on the wall behind.

Manufract© Manufract
Manufract© Manufract

From jewelry to wool-based furniture, or furniture made from wood shavings, bio-resins are helping designers create useful designs from by-products that might have otherwise discarded. In these designs here, the resins add more life, light and interest to the overall design. To see more or purchase, visit Manufract.

Tags: Furniture | Germany | Recycled Building Materials

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