Flat pack Freeform furniture is digitally fabricated with triangles

Adorjan Portik
© Adorjan Portik

Digital fabrication and parametric design is changing the way we make buildings and furniture, creating unexpected spaces and functionality that were not possible before, though its future sustainability is another debate. Nevertheless, it's intriguing to see more examples coming to the fore; using a series of variable triangles in his Freeform Building system, Hungarian designer Adorjan Portik is able to create materially efficient furniture with curved surfaces and different thicknesses.

Portik's Freeform armchair and stool are assembled from flat packed pieces, which make transport much simpler. They begin as 3D computer models, and after modelling the curved surfaces, they are translated into triangles and cut with a laser cutter, numbered and put together.

© Adorjan Portik
© Adorjan Portik

The Freeform armchair is composed of 55 triangulated pieces of 6 millimetre-thick beech plywood, creating two layers, while the Freeform stool consists of 12 pieces in a one-layered surface. The end result are works that are both lightweight yet sturdy, and also iconic in form (being faintly reminiscent of those classic Eames chairs).

© Adorjan Portik
© Adorjan Portik
© Adorjan Portik
© Adorjan Portik

Seen here in a scaled-down form of furnishing that looks and acts monolithically but isn't as wasteful, Portik's Freeform could have many more future applications in architecture and design. More over at Freeform Building.

Tags: Furniture

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