3-Way Ping Pong Table Seen at London's Clerkenwell Design Week

Bonnie Alter/CC BY 2.0

Clerkenwell Design Week is only three days long but it is packed full of design. Held in three old historic buildings in London's trendy east end, there is a good mix of British and European designers and manufacturers.

These stools, made out of recycled cardboard, are from the Netherlands. They are flat pack, can be recycled and come in a number of different patterns. Note the blue and white "delft" one.

Bonnie Alter/CC BY 2.0

Also made in Holland, but designed in the USA, are Scraplights. They are made from salvaged cardboard and non-toxic adhesive. The laser cutting process makes the edges darker and gives off a smell of a campfire. Very good looking.

Bonnie Alter/CC BY 2.0

It's a three-way ping pong table and it is a challenge. It is designed by the Redundant Architects Recreation Association (RARA), (they should have branches in every city), which is actually a flexible and affordable project space. The table is being designed as a community project, to get people involved in its creation and in recreation.

Bonnie Alter/CC BY 2.0

Called "The Leftover Collection", these chairs by Rabih Hage are just that. Created for Corian® Colour Evolution in the Milan Design Show this year, they are made out of leftover materials, off-cuts and discarded planks. There are tables as well. The designer says: "Imperfection is beauty; a discarded material is as noble and precious as a newly polished stone."

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Ernest Race was an important English furniture designer in the late 1940's and '50's. Many of his ground-breaking chairs are being re-issued, including the wonderful and sculptural Antelope.This chair is the Kangaroo, and this is the original. Only ten or fifteen were made for the World Fair in 1952.

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This cork coffee table is by Deadgood Studio. New for the Design Week, they are made of laminated cork and birch plywood.

© Giles Miller Petr Krejci

Giles Miller has created an entrance in the form of a timber archway inside the original concrete arches of a 150 year old warehouse that is one of the venues of the Week. It is made up of 20,000 angled wooden pixels, each laser-cut and identical in same size. They are set at different angles to catch the light and depict architectural detailing that is similar to the Victorian stone facade outside.

Bonnie Alter/CC BY 2.0

The Solar Tree by Ross Lovegrove is a 20 foot high solar-powered street lamp. It has ten "branches" equipped with photovoltaic cells to collect solar energy during the day; four of which provide light from LED fittings when it is darker. Solar energy is accumulated through photovoltaic cells in the "heads" and stored in integrated batteries.

They light up the street by night, and it is hoped that they will offer free charging points for phones and laptops. The light produced is equivalent to an output of 23 watts and when fully charged, the streetlight is able to function for 7-10 days without further charging. It will be there throughout the Olympics.

Tags: Designers | Furniture | London

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