Modern 'train-nomad' chooses to live on trains instead of renting (Video)

SWR.de
Video screen capture SWR.de

How far would you go to get out of the rent or mortgage trap? Some drastically downsize and move into a smaller apartment, hobbit house or tiny home. One 23-year-old German woman, fed up of dealing with a difficult landlord, decided to give up her apartment to live and work on a train, almost full-time.

Tübingen University student Leonie Müller made the decision back in spring, as she tells the Washington Post:

It all started with a dispute I had with my landlord. I instantly decided I didn't want to live there anymore — and then I realized: Actually, I didn't want to live anywhere anymore.

Müller then edited her belongings down to a small backpack, carrying her clothes and a tablet computer, which she uses to write her papers. She now buys a monthly pass costing USD $380 that allows her to travel around the country on any train, and other forms of public transport. She washes in the train bathroom, and visits friends and relatives in various places, sometimes staying the night there.

So far, Müller is enjoying this liberating experience. "It's like being on vacation all the time," she says. Her personal, one-year-long experiment is going to have some academic weight to it as well: she is currently blogging about her experiences as a "train-nomad" on There You Are, and will write a thesis paper on it as well. But it's also to push others to introspect and think a bit deeper about their own lives:

I want to inspire people to question their habits and the things they consider to be normal. There are always more opportunities than one thinks there are. The next adventure is waiting just around the corner — provided that you want to find it.

How true that is. For some, this adventure may mean living on an iceberg, or the side of a cliff, or living comfortably out of your van. In any case, it's imperative to live life to its very fullest, whatever that may mean for you, and not by someone else's conventions. More over at the Washington Post and There You Are (in German).

Tags: Apartments | Germany | Housing Industry

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