Watch Films on Recycled Fridges


Photo: filmsonfridges

Here's a project that gives a whole new meaning to pop-up and recycling. Films on Fridges is an outdoor cinema made entirely from discarded refrigerator doors. It has popped up near the 2012 Olympic Park.

Guess what they will be showing: sporting classics, in tribute to the spirit of the Games. See Rocky, or Chariots of Fire on the back of a fridge.


Photo: filmsonfridges

For 17 days, the pop-up project will pay tribute to the spirit of the Olympics by screening sporting classics such as Slapshot, and Fire in Babylon, as well as athletically themed indie finds. Lucky patrons will watch the films on an inflatable pop-up cinema screen and sit on chairs made from fridges of course. It's open air and it's cool-ish so there are blankets for hire.

It's a way to celebrate the industrial heritage of the area and celebrate the Games in a fun, and recycled way as well as a chance to eat popcorn under the stars in the summer.

Money for the arts is tight so people are looking for innovative ways to fund projects. Crowd funding is one way, if you are lucky, and this one obviously caught donors' imagination. They raised more than the $6,000 needed through Kickstarter. Architecture students designed and built it.


Photo: filmsonfridges
Films on Fridges is also raising awareness of waste and environmental responsibility because of the fascinating background to the venue. This area used to be home to the largest dump site of abandoned fridges in Europe. Called Fridge Mountain, they accumulated there because of EU regulations which prohibited the old way of crushing them because this method released CFC's into the atmosphere. It was prohibited but it took a long while before another method of getting rid of them was agreed upon. Hence the 20 ft. high mountain which built up at a rate of 6,500 fridges a day.

More on Pop-Up Projects
Popping a Room on Top of a Theatre--Why?
Let's Spend the Night Together--On a "Boat" on Top of a Building
Deptford Project Café by Morag Myerscough

Tags: Architects | Olympics